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to be necessary. charles murray said in his fantastic book, what we have now is a bifurcated society where the upper classes are still getting married and staying married at roughly the rates that they did in the 1950 p's. they are fine, their kids are doing well. their kids are getting into college. a professor at cornell said he looked around the classroom and relies that every single kid in his class came from a [no audio]we have this bifurcated world where the middle and upper classes are marrying, raising their kids in a wholesome environment and doing well, and the rest of society, the bottom half, is fleeting marriage and is suffering as a consequence. as murray said in his book, if the upper classes would simply preach with a prop is, he would -- preach what they practice, you would eventually get somewhere. >> we have an entire population now i women who choose not to marry and choose not to be mothers. it is not a circumstance, it is a lifestyle. consumer america has dealt with this for years. consumer america has to sell soup, food, and cars every day. political america shows u
. on domestic issues, it was simple. i was a great society liberal. then i read charles murray, "losing ground," and for someone who is wanted doctor, i am open to empirical evidence. it was a dallas -- it was a disaster. i began to change on domestic policy and i realize that, however good the intentions of american liberalism and it was destroying a whole sector of society and destroying the lives, the culture, the resolve, the character of the people it wanted to help. so that is how it happened. they moved on domestic affairs and i moved and i am where i am now. of course, that is a long way to say that i was young once. [laughter] >> q u concern note -- you consider yourself a new conservative? is that a term that is used anymore? >> know. it is now an epithet. it was -- there was wanted someone had a meeting. -- a meaning. today it's usually meant as a nym for jewish conservatism. whenever you hear the word, i challenge the person to describe and explain to you what a new icon is and i guarantee you they will have no answer. it used to mean somebody who was once a level and became more
partnership with senate majority leader rodney tom and minority leader ed murray, and with house speaker frank chopp and minority leader richard debolt. i want us to collaborate early legislature already to begin need to talk to you about the future of our state. when the people of yakima senti sat and listened as former washington's second century. he said "either we respond to international competition, or we doom ourselves and our children to a dramatic slide to second-rate status in the world." we chose to answer this challenge, with a unique formula for international success that has made us who we are today, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has
, george, and mr. murray. >> our next panel, i will first introduced dr. michael hogan. the former commissioner of the new york state office of mental health and the new freedom commission on mental health. his capacity of overseeing the public mental-health system. he previously served as the ohio director of public health and the commissioner of the connecticut department of mental health. for purposes of introduction, i turn to senator alexander. >> i am delighted to welcome robert viro of tennessee. he has done work at the behavioral health care field for a long time, 40 years. he is chief executive of the company, and non-profit organization. they have more than 50 facilities, 160 partnership locations serving 50,000 people of all ages each year. his distinguished background includes work at vanderbilt, he is a clinician and he has been consulted by many for his expertise in his field and i look forward to his insights about the need to tell and how we can do a better job of making sure that they have helped. >> thank you, center alexander. >> it is a great privilege to introd
at how people live, we just do live in two different countries. i think that charles murray's book last year was a very powerful way of laying that out. >> but this is a very peculiar problem that we face. we all talk about this. i think we are all along about it, even if you are not a hard- line social conservative. yet, what we do not see -- what we have not seen are the social dislocation costs of this. that is to say, when we started "the weekly standard" in 1995, the prognostic of peace that would make you laugh if you went back to look at it was by a criminologist and sociologists called "here come the super predators." the argument was we had created a generation of 17-year-old youth whose fathers had been in prison, who had never seen a strong family, and basically, they were on the way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. it is a wonderful piece. it was perfectly argued, and it made absolute sense at the time that we publish it, and it was so wildly wrong. it is not 18 years later. we h
anymore. on domestic issues, it was simple. i was a great society liberal. then i read charles murray, "losing ground," and for someone who is wanted doctor, i am open to empirical evidence. it was a dallas -- it was a disaster. i began to change on domestic policy and i realize that, however good the intentions of american liberalism and it was destroying a whole sector of society and destroying the lives, the culture, the resolve, the character of the people it wanted to help. so that is how it happened. they moved on domestic affairs and i moved and i am where i am now. of course, that is a long way to say that i was young once. [laughter] >> q u concern note -- you consider yourself a new conservative? is that a term that is used anymore? >> know. it is now an epithet. it was -- there was wanted someone had a meeting. -- a meaning. today it's usually meant as a silent synonym for jewish conservatism. whenever you hear the word, i challenge the person to describe and explain to you what a new icon is and i guarantee you they will have no answer. it used to mean somebody who was on
countries. i think charles murray's book last year lays it out. >> we all talk about this and we are alarmed about it. see, thewe don't social dislocation costs of this. when we started the weekly standard in 1995, a very good piece but it will make you laugh if you go back and look at>> bu. the argument was that we had created a generation of 17-year- old whose fathers had been in prison, they had never seen a strong family. they were on their way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. it was a wonderful piece that was perfectly argued and it made sense at the time that we published it. it was so wildly wrong that 18 years later, we have lived through a decline in crime. not one person was killed last week in new york city. that has not happened. someone mispronounced my name that i was taught him. part of the difficulty is that when we talk about this and we look at this horrible trend upon us, it has been upon us for 40 years and most social indices that we can look at suggest that the country is st
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)